WEAPONS AND EQUIPMENT

Our Weapons:

Please know that at close range, blanks are as dangerous as live rounds. These are real weapons, and there are great risks to hearing and lives if safety precautions aren’t followed. We cleave to a military style of safe handling of weapons.

M2HB Browning – Ma Deuce!
M2 Ma Deuce
The Browning M2 is an air-cooled, belt-fed machine gun. The M2 fires from a closed bolt, operated on the short recoil principle. The M2 fires .50 BMG cartridges, which offer long range, accuracy and immense stopping power. At the outbreak of the Second World War the United States had versions of the M2 in service as fixed aircraft guns, infantry (tripod-mounted) guns, and as dual-purpose anti-aircraft and anti-vehicular weapons on vehicles
M1919 Browning Machine Gun
M1919 Browning
The M1919 Browning is a .30 caliber medium machine gun widely used during World War II. The M1919 saw service as a light infantry, coaxial, mounted, aircraft, and anti-aircraft machine gun by the U.S. and many other countries. As a company or battalion support weapon, the M1919 required at least a two-man machine gun team. However, in practice, four men were normally involved: the gunner, the assistant gunner (who helped feed the gun), and two ammunition carriers.
M1918 Browning – BAR
M1918 BAR
The M1918 is chambered for the .30-06 Springfield rifle cartridge and uses a 20 round box magazine. Shooting at a maximum rate of 650 rounds per minute, the BAR was designed to be carried by advancing infantrymen, slung over the shoulder or fired from the hip, a concept called “walking fire”. However, in practice, it was most often used as a light machine gun and fired from a bipod. Fire and movement tactics centered on the M1 riflemen in the squad, while the BAR man was detailed to support the riflemen in the attack and provide mobility to the riflemen with a base of fire.
M1A1 Thompson
M1A1 Thompson
The M1A1 Thompson submachine gun is fully automatic and fires a .45 caliber bullets at 700 rounds per minute. The gun was prized by those lucky enough to get one for its high rate of fire and stopping power. It proved itself in the close street fighting that was encountered frequently during the invasion of France. The M1A1 is a simplified version of previous Thompsons, created in order to reduce production costs. Over 1.5 million military Thompson submachine guns were produced during the war.
M3 Grease Gun
M3 Grease Gun
The M3 was an American .45-caliber submachine gun adopted for U.S. Army service on 12 December 1942. The M3 was chambered for the same .45 round fired by the Thompson submachine gun, but was cheaper to produce, lighter, and more accurate. With its stamped, riveted, and welded construction, the M3 was originally designed as a minimum-cost small arm, to be used and discarded once it became inoperative.
M3A1 Grease Gun
M3A1 Grease Gun
In December 1944 a modernized version of the M3 was introduced into service known as the M3A1, with many parts interchangeable with those of the M3. The M3A1 had several improvements, the largest being the elimination of the troublesome crank-type cocking lever assembly. A recessed slot was machined into the bolt, which could cock the gun by using a finger to pull the bolt back. The M3A1 modifications resulted in a more reliable, lighter weight, easier to maintain and easier to field strip submachine gun.
M1 Carbine
M1 Carbine
The M1 carbine is a lightweight .30 caliber semi-automatic carbine that became a standard firearm for the U.S. military during World War II. The first M1 carbines were delivered in mid-1942, with initial priority given to troops in the European Theater of Operations. The M1 carbine gained high praise for its firepower, small size, and light weight, especially by those troops who were unable to use a full-size rifle as their primary weapon.
M2 Carbine
M2 Carbine
Initially, the M1 carbine was intended to have a select-fire capability, but in order to speed development of the adopted design, a decision was made to omit this feature. On October 26, 1944 in response to increased use of automatic fire weapons on the battlefield like the German Sturmgewehr 44, the select-fire M2 carbine was adopted along with a new 30-round magazine. The M2 has a fully automatic rate-of-fire of 850-900 rounds-per-minute.
M1 Garand
M1 Garand
Called “the greatest battle implement ever devised” by General George S. Patton, the M1 Garand is a semi-automatic clip-fed rifle chambered for the .30-06 Springfield rifle cartridge. It was the first standard-issue semi-automatic military rifle, used by the United States Army starting in 1936 when it replaced the M1903 Springfield. The rifle is loaded by inserting an en-bloc metal clip (containing eight rounds) into the receiver. After the eight rounds have been shot, the empty clip automatically ejects with an audible “ping” noise.
M1 Garand Sniper
M1 Garand Sniper
Called “the greatest battle implement ever devised” by General George S. Patton, the M1 Garand is a semi-automatic clip-fed rifle chambered for the .30-06 Springfield rifle cartridge. It was the first standard-issue semi-automatic military rifle, used by the United States Army starting in 1936 when it replaced the M1903 Springfield. The rifle is loaded by inserting an en-bloc metal clip (containing eight rounds) into the receiver. After the eight rounds have been shot, the empty clip automatically ejects with an audible “ping” noise.
M1903 Springfield Sniper
M1903 Springfield Snpier
The M1903 Springfield is a 5-round magazine fed, bolt-action service repeating rifle. The integral magazine could be top-loaded from a 5-cartridge stripper clip. It was officially adopted as a United States military bolt-action rifle on June 19, 1903, and saw service in World War I. The M1903 Springfield remained in service as a standard issue infantry rifle during World War II, since the U.S. entered the war without sufficient M1 rifles to arm all troops. The M1903 rifle saw extensive use and action in the hands of U.S. troops in Europe, North Africa, and the Pacific. It also remained in service as a sniper rifle during the war.
M1911 Pistol
M1911 Pistol
The M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated pistol chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge. It served as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States Armed Forces from 1911 to 1986. During the war, the U.S. Government procured about 1.9 million units. Designed by John Browning, the M1911 is the best known of his designs to use the short recoil principle in its basic design. This system was widely copied, and is found in nearly every modern center fire pistol.
M1917 Revolver
M1917 Revolver
The M1917 Revolver (formally United States Revolver, Caliber .45, M1917) was a U.S. six-shot revolver of .45 ACP caliber. There were two variations of the M1917, one made by Colt and the other made by Smith & Wesson.
SW Model 10 Victory
SW Model 10 Victory
The S&W Model 10 military revolver was produced from 1942 to 1944, and had serial numbers with a “V” prefix, known as the Smith & Wesson Victory Model. This six shot, double action revolver was used by the US with .38 special cartridges. Over 500,000 of these pistols were also produced for various countries during World War II, including the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa.