WW2 VEHICLES

Our WW2 Era Vehicles:

M20 Armored Utility Car – “OY VEY” and “No Name Yet!”

Oy Vey

M20-2-1

OY VEY is a fully authentic M20 Armored Utility Car. The M20 was based on the M8 light armored car, called the “Greyhound” by British troops. While the M8 had a 37mm main gun in an open-top turret, the turret in the M20 was replaced by an open crew compartment with a gun ring to support a heavy machine gun. The M20 is a 6×6 vehicle, powered by the same Hercules 6-cylinder gasoline engine that powers the M3 White Scout Car. It weighs approximately 12,000 pounds, which does cause some strain on the Hercules engine when going up hills or over rough terrain.

M3A1 Halftrack – “SHOMER”

Halftrack

SHOMER is a fully authentic M3A1 Halftrack. The M3 Personnel Carrier was designed to carry doughs to the fight while keeping up with the armor as it advanced into enemy territory. Unlike the M2, which was designed as an artillery prime mover and reconnaissance vehicle, the M3 was altered to carry more doughs (ten in the rear seats, though more can fit if needed). The M3 often had a mounted machine gun, either a M1919A4 .30 or a Ma Deuce (M2HB) .50, in a M25 pedestal mount.

M3 Scout Car – “MESHUGGAH” and “CHUTZPAH”

Meshuggah-1

Chutzpah-1

MESHUGGAH and CHUTZPAH are fully authentic M3 White Scout Cars, and are some of our first vehicles. The Scout Car was built by the White Motor Company, with designs beginning in 1937. It is powered by inline 6 cylinder flat-head gasoline Hercules engine, and we speak from experience when we say it has incredible torque. It weighs about 9,000 pounds. It is a full time four-wheel drive vehicle, with a transfer case supporting high and low range. It has a four-speed manual transmission, with the first gear rarely being used. The Scout Car generally came equipped with a Ma Deuce (M2HB) .50 machine gun, and two M1919 or M1917 .30 machine guns.

1942 GMC CCKW 2.5 ton 6×6 – “ZEYDE”

zeyde_1

ZEYDE is a fully authentic GMC CCKW 2.5 ton 6×6 truck. The GMC CCKW is the original “deuce and a half,” designed to haul men and materials to and from the front lines. It was the backbone of the famous Red Ball Express post-Normandy. Almost 570,000 were built in WWII, from 1941 through 1945; only the Jeep exceeded this manufacturing figure. It saw action in both WWII and the Korean War. The CCKW weighs in at 8,800 pounds empty, and can carry another 8,000 pounds without issue. Some CCKWs had a winch mounted to the front, providing 10,000 pounds of pulling power. The CCKW is powered by a GMC 270 91HP engine.

Chevrolet G506 4×4 1.5 ton – “BUBBE”

bubbe_1

BUBBE is a fully authentic Chevrolet G506 4×4 1.5 ton truck. The G506 was manufactured by Chevrolet from 1940 until 1945, with 168,603 of them being produced by the end of WWII. It weighs 8,215 pounds when empty, is almost 19 feet long, is just over 7 feet wide, and is almost 9 feel tall. It is powered by the Chevrolet BV-1001-UP 235 cubic inch inline 6-cylinder gasoline engine, which produces 83HP at 3100RPM. This is the smaller version of the engine found in our CCKW, ZEYDE. It is a four-wheel drive truck, with a high and low range. It can reach just over 45MPH.

M5A4 High Speed Tractor – “No Name Yet!”

new

Our High Speed Tractor is a fully authentic M5 HST. The M5 HST was designed and built by International Harvester, beginning in 1942. It was based on the design of the T21 prototype, using the tracks and suspension of the M5 Stuart light tank. It is just over 16 feet long, just over eight feet wide, and almost nine feet tall. It is powered by a Continental R6572 six-cylinder gasoline engine, producing 207HP and a top speed of 30MPH. The M5 HST can get up and go! It handles well. The M5 HST has a crew of one, the driver, though in practice it could carry up to 11 total personnel (more, of course, when the going got tough). It generally carried the artillery gun crew, as well as their supplies (personal gear, bedrolls, artillery ammo) and occasionally a Ma Deuce (M2HB) .50 machine gun atop the HST.

Ford GPW Jeep – A1 and A2

Jeep A1

Jeep A2

Our Jeeps are fully authentic Ford GPW Jeeps. The Jeeps were used as command vehicles, logistics, reconnaissance vehicles, even ambulances. They are well suited to a wide variety of tasks. They can hold four to five troopers somewhat comfortably, and more when it’s time to be Oscar Mike! Reconnaissance units would mount a Browning M1919 .30 machine gun on them, or replace that with a M2HB .50 heavy machine gun. They also carried a mortar crew and mortar. Some Jeeps had heavy radio sets installed, either for the commander or part of a signals unit.

Dodge WC-63 6×6 1.5 ton Truck

WC 63

Our WC63 is a fully authentic Dodge WC-63 6×6 1.5-ton truck Dodge began producing military trucks in 1939, with the 1/2 ton 4×4 VC series as its first model. Production began in 1940, and Dodge created 38 models. The G507 (T-223) series included the WC63. This model was designed as a cargo and personnel carrier, built on three axles and capable of six-wheel drive. While the WC62 and WC63 look the same, the WC63 includes a Braden MU2 winch capable of pulling 7,500 pounds. The WC63 is 18.66 feet long, just over 7 feet tall without the machine gun ring mount, and is almost 7 feet wide. It weighs 10,525 pounds, and can carry a payload of 3,300 pounds. These vehicles are excellent off-road, with a ground clearance of over 10 inches under the axles and just over 16 inches under the chassis. It is powered by the Dodge L-head 6-cylinder engine that produces 76HP at 3,200RPM. This can drive the truck at speeds approaching 50MPH.

Dodge WC-54 Ambulance

WC 54

Our WC54 is a fully authentic Dodge WC-54 Ambulance. The Dodge WC54 3/4 Ton 4×4 G502 truck was a 4×4 truck developed by Dodge during WWII. It was designed to replace the WC9, WC18, and the WC27 Truck 1/2 ton 4×4 Dodge Ambulance G505. It had a longer wheelbase and an improved suspension designed to make the ride easier on the wounded soldiers inside. The crew was generally a driver and a medic, and it could carry up to seven patients depending on whether they were seated or lying down. The cab also included a heater, which was a novel and welcome luxury for both the crew and the patients. The Dodge WC54 was powered by the 3.8L straight-six (or inline-six) I6 gasoline engine, and a four-speed manual transmission.